Hue – A Foodie’s Paradise

Hue – A Foodie’s Paradise

Hue was on my list as we planned out our trip to Vietnam. Ho Chi Minh (Saigon) was on B, and Hanoi we knew we had to do. I wanted to do Hue for the Old Imperial Capital, or the Citadel as they call it… but what I quickly came to learn about Hue was more than old building ruins, I have learned the Hue should be more known for the food.

Sure Bourdain (RIP) had visited before, and I had seen the last episode he did while visiting the region, but it didn’t hit me until our first meal. In the pouring, soon to be monsoon-like, rain that stayed with us the entire time, we made our way to grab some lunch after our hour flight from Hanoi. We stumbled upon the restaurant and bar area of Hue city centre and plopped down at a place called Xuân Trang where I order Banh Khoai (without the pork of course!) and an order of chicken with rice. B got Nem Lui (ground pork patties grilled on lemongrass skewers). Place number one set the bar high.

Our first food in Hue was amazing, my jet-lag, not so much. Four days into the trip and I still had trouble sleeping the entire night, needing naps during the day… but my Hue nap took us into well into the night and we ended up missing dinner. At 11:30 pm we took to the street only to find that Hue is not a town of late night eats. After wandering around for a good 30 minutes in the rain, I turned on my data and found a food stall that serves burgers and fries… not very traditional but I was starving. We weren’t the only ones, and found a group of three Malaysian travellers who were also in search of food. We all went to the burger stand together and took it back to our respective hotels… even Hue’s roadside burgers and fries are outstanding!

Breakfast the next morning was included in our hotel. The buffet had a wide assortment of fresh fruit, breads and pastries, meats (which B made a comment on), rice, crepes and more. What really stood out was the pho. I’ve come to learn over my short time in Vietnam is that pho is eaten really any time of the day… and it differs depending on the city (not really a surprise here). B was so obsessed with it that he convinced me to get a bowl. And he was right to obsess over it, it was THAT good. (Naturally I asked for mine without the beef in it – I’m so complicated)

Aside from the Banh Khoai which I so desperately wanted to try, I wanted Banh Beo. These tiny coin shaped rice circles come with shrimp and fried onions and I had had them at a Vietnamese restaurant back in Canada. Knowing that they’re a uniquely Hue dish, I knew I had to check it off my list. We ordered a dish of them at a restaurant called Madam Thu, which serves up traditional Vietnamese food and has vegetarian options! As our mains, B ordered chicken and rice while I ordered a vegetarian Banh Khoai (honestly, could not get enough on that stuff!). Our Banh Beo came with the traditional fish sauce but what really made the dish was the chilli sauce that they provided. The spicy was a nice compliment and I should have ordered more.

I could go on and on about the food in Hue, but all good things must come to an end. Aside from the endless rain, and the crippling jet lag that I still haven’t kicked after 6 days, we’ve made our way to our next destination (Hoi An). But I know that Hue will always have a special place in my food-loving heart.

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4 things to know before going to your 1st premier league game

4 things to know before going to your 1st premier league game

Ok, I have a confession to make… I know nothing about soccer, errr, I mean football… but on my latest trip to the UK, I faked it.

Three weeks before boarding our flight to London, B texted me to say he could score Premier League tickets for under $150 CAD each. While it’s a steep price to pay for a game that I know very little about, I’m always up for an experience while on a trip. And honestly, what’s more authentic than seeing a game of footie? After some himming and hahhing around the price, we bit the bullet and bought the tickets through Stub Hub.

If you’ve never been to a premier league game before, or even if you have, these are some observations/lessons learned from my first-time experience.

Don’t expect to actually sit in your seat. Unless you’re in the first few rows of the lower bowl of course. Our seats where at the end field behind the net, which would have been fine if we were sitting… but everyone stands THE ENTRIE GAME! Since our seats were behind the net, there was a bit of an overhang. This wouldn’t have been an issue if everyone was seated, but instead we were forced to bend over every time there was action at the other end of the field. While it was annoying, it was a lesson learned.

I could see the whole field when I was in the stairwell… but the rest of the game, I was looking at the gent’s head in front of me.

There are no beverages allowed in the stands. Going into the game, I knew this, but coming from Canada where sports and beer are a match made in heaven, it was a bit strange. Instead, hoards of people begin to leave their un-sat-in seats to pound two brews during the brief intermission about 5 minutes before the first half of the game is over. I admit, it’s not a terrible idea to not allow alcohol in the stands (it keeps it cleaner for sure), but the pounding of multiple pints isn’t very enjoyable for someone like me who likes to enjoy a beer unrushed.

The chants are about anything and everything. I had heard that some of the chants were offensive but I came to realize that most are completely random. One in particular seemed to have been created on the spot about a lone pigeon that was enjoying the sun on the field. While the game played on around him, he appeared to give little care to who was winning, or if the ball was flying in his direction. After about 15 minutes in his front row view of the game, he took off for flight and the chant “One Chelsea Pigeon” started up. I assumed it was something that happened so often that the chant was a common one, but I looked… it’s not. I’ll never forget the One Chelsea Pigeon chant for as long as I live.

You’ll need a ticket to get into the Club’s Pub after the game – and you’ll want to do it! After the game everyone takes to the street in search of winning celebrations. If your team loses, then I’m sure everyone’s out to drown their sorrows, thankfully Chelsea won! In our case, we wanted a pint at a local and it just so happens that the pub where Chelsea FC all started it just down the road a bit from where we exited. To get in post-game, you’ll need to show your ticket… and if you’re wearing the away jersey, don’t expect to get in. The place is packed and like most pubs, you go straight to the bar to order your drink… then it’s standing room only (unless you left the game in time to get a table). Post game celebrations are a must and really round out the entire experience.

Have you been to a premier league game before? If so, I’d love to hear about it! Leave a comment below 🙂

My top 5s of Toronto

My top 5s of Toronto

 

This past weekend, a friend of mine flew in from Calgary. He had been to Toronto a handful of times and was only in town for a day. After arranging a time to meet up, the old familiar question came up, “So, what do you wanna do?”

This all too familiar question is one that I ask myself on a weekly basis, usually over Saturday morning coffee with B – What do we want to do? It’s summer in Canada’s most populated city and yet, we still need to ask ourselves that question… usually to the same answer, “I dunno.”

As I reflect on this question, I’ve devised a list of my top three things to do in the following 5 categories:

  • Shopping
  • Adventure
  • Food and Drinks
  • Nightlife
  • Free

Hopefully, by the end, I’ll have answered my question so I can make the most of the rest of this summer – and you can too!

Shopping

I’m definitely not a mega shopper by any means, but I do enjoy a splurge every once in a while. Which is why I really love Yorkville. This pedestrian-friendly shopping district has all of the big names Carrie Bradshaw would crave. Prada, Gucci, and Louis Vuitton to name a few (I’m sure you’ve heard of them), but also shops that are a little more within my price range – There’s even a Winners!!

If big names aren’t your style and you’re looking for something a little more eclectic, Kensington Market has you covered. Located just north of Chinatown, Kensington Market is a pedestrian district filled with vintage inspired shops, cute cafes, and instagram-worthy corners. It’s not for the faint of heart, but an area that everyone needs to visit at least once.

If it’s food you love to shop for, hands-down my favourite foodie find is St. Lawrence Market. Within walking distance from Union Station, you’ll want to bring your appetite to St. Lawrence Market. The indoor market is open year-round and holds a multitude of butchers, cheesemongers, vegetable vendors, bakeries, and even a mustard vendor! Head downstairs if you need a break from shopping and indulge in any culture of foods – but really, what you’ll want is the eggplant parmesan sandwich from Uno Mustachio and you may want to split it with a friend!

Adventure

In my opinion, you can’t truly adventure in Toronto without visiting the Toronto Islands. The islands are just a short ferry ride away and are the perfect mini adventure to escape from the hustle and bustle of the city. Since you can’t drive to the islands, boating or biking are often transportation methods of choice. You can rent either from either side of the ferry and even though hoards of people make their way across every summer weekend, there’s plenty of water-front locations that you can call your own. If you’re feeling extra adventurous, there’s always Hanlan’s Point (the ever so popular clothing-optional beach).

Toronto Island

If you’re someone who likes to splurge for adventure, there’s always the CN Tower edgewalk. Now I’ll be honest, this isn’t exactly how I would prefer to spend a lovely Sunday afternoon, but for those who are super adventurous and aren’t afraid of heights – this one’s for you.

For those who cringe at the thought of extreme heights and hanging out nude outdoors, there’s always Toronto’s multitude of Escape Rooms. These puzzles have themes that appeal to almost everyone from a Harry Potter themed adventure to escaping rooms in a real life castle at Casa Loma!

Food and Drink

If I’m going to be completely honest with myself, 90% of my entertainment in this city centres around food, and drinking. It’s a vice that I don’t know if I want to kick considering the territory I still have yet to cover.

For evenings that are special, I like to spend the night at a little place in the Distillery called Cluny. This French-inspired bistro never fails to impress me. From the wine selection to the ever-changing, seasonal menu, this resto is our go-to when we want to splurge.

I’ve always said that my last meal on Earth would be Mexican and Toronto definitely punches above its weight in delivering authentic cuisine that is muy bien. With so many great places, it’s hard to short list them but if I must, here are my top 3:

  • Playa Cabana on Dupont
  • El Caballito Taquila y Tacos on King St W
  • Barrio Cerveceria on Queen E

If it wasn’t Mexican, or French, it would have to be Japanese. When we moved to Toronto almost two years ago, I have to admit that good sushi was hard to find… but Izakayas are second to none (ok… maybe Japan). Our go-to Japanese snack bar is a little off the traditional tourist path, but well worth it: Sake Bar Kushi on Eglinton.

Nightlife

My nights of bar hopping and cover have long since past – so if you’re looking to me to tell you the hot dance spots in TO, I’m sorry to disappoint. Instead, I’d rather gather with a group of friends over drinks and fun. Here are my top three ways to spend an evening on the town.

I’m competitive… so when I can spend an evening kicking my friends’ asses at a game of ping pong over beer, I’m all of it. SPIN, located on King W, is my absolute favourite place to crush an evening.

Toronto attracts talent – so it’s no shocker that on most weekends, you can catch some type of show. With 5 Mirvish theatres in the downtown core, and multiple music venues big and small, a night out to catch a show is within easy reach.

If a more laid back, tame evening is what you’re looking for, gathering with friends over some board games is always a good time. Snakes and Lattes (not just coffee, they have beer and wine too!) allows you to play unlimited games with your crew without needed to pack your closet with an assortment of games you’ll only play once or twice.

Free

Living in Toronto isn’t cheap, so sometimes all a girl needs is a night that doesn’t put a dent into my bank account. The city is insanely walkable – even though it’s a very vast city. I’d recommend exploring one neighbourhood at a time and expand from there. Harbourfront, Queen West, Leslieville, and the Distillery District are all good places to start!

Coming from the east coast, I have always been spoiled by beauty and beaches… grudgingly, I have to say that Toronto has somewhat the same. While the beaches in Toronto are 10x more populated, and not on the ocean, they’re free and a great way to spend a summer day.

One thing that Toronto also does well is festivals – and many of them have free components. Just this past weekend, there were at least 3 festivals happening on the same weekend, all with free entry (but bring cash for some cheap eats).

The many beers of Bavaria

The many beers of Bavaria

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When people first think of Munich, many think of the world famous Oktoberfest, lederhosen, and beer… and I’m not going to lie, before heading there I had the same preconceptions too. However, after spending a week in the area, I’ve come to realize there’s more to Bavaria than just beer, beer, and well, more beer, despite the title of this blog post 😉

Our first beer on the trip introduced us to HOFBRÄU MÜNCHEN WEISSE, which we lovingly enjoyed in the Hofbräuhaus. This iconic landmark provided us with a great introduction to Bavarian beer, and culture. The large beerhall consists of high cellings and long tables, which encourages you to meet new people to share a pint with. Within a short time of being seated, a nice local couple sat next to us. It was quite clear that we weren’t from around the area and offered to take our photo. From there, we enjoyed the live music together and even though we couldn’t speak the same language, I’d like to think there was a small bond between us and them.

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When we crossed the border to neighbouring Austria, our beer of choice was of course Stiegl. At this point in our trip, I had been living off head-sized pretzels and I was looking for something to round out my limited diet. Thankfully, Salzburg had just what I needed. The land of Mozart and Sound of Music supplied me with chicken schnitzel, salads, and bread with cheese and it was all glorious. Aside from the food, the town was quaint and conveniently located to where I really wanted to make a visit – Berchtesgaden.

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I had heard about Berchtesgaden from a coworker who visited there when she spent a semester abroad in high school. This charming little town built on the edge of the Austrian alps is known for skiing, hiking, and history. When I say history, I refer to the Eagle’s Nest, a mountain top retreat gifted to Hitler on his 50th birthday. This majestic retreat is now a tourist attraction with thousands of visitors making the trek, dining at the mountain’s edge, with their selfie sticks at the ready. At the foot of the mountain is Dokumentationszentrum Obersalzberg, a powerful museum that takes you through the rise and fall of the Nazi party. I always thought that this was something that Germany wanted to forget, but this museum shows the importance of highlighting the past, to ensure that history does not attempt to repeat itself. As I mentioned, it’s a powerful museum and I’m forever grateful that I had the chance to walk through and learn of the history from the German’s perspective compared to what we learn growing up in Canada.

As I basked in the sun on the top of the mountain ridge, I enjoyed some more Hofbräu. It was my birthday afterall 😉 Before taking the golden lift to the top, we had lunch with some non-alcoholic brews (yes, they have non-alcoholic beer too!) produced by Weininger. It was light and refreshing and paired nicely with my veggie burger! I’m as surprised as you that not only did this restaurant have non-alcoholic beer, but they also had VEGGIE BURGERS! It truly was a win in my books!

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The beer gardens of Munich are plentiful and populated. On our last day in Munich, after quite the eventful morning where I dropped my backpack into a bath of toilet water (it was honestly the worst morning of our trip), I needed one last beer garden brew. Again, it was Hofbräu but about the size of my head. It was a Tuesday and the small garden located along the river was less populated as it was near the banking district. As I got my second, and smaller beer, I decided that the mug from which I was drinking would make a good souvenir. Something to note, that I wish I had known earlier, is that every beer garden charges you a deposit on the mug. When you order your beer, you pay an extra two Euro or three, depending on the location. If you bring the mug back, you get your money. If not, the mug is yours. I only learned this on the last day in the beer garden when I asked if I could buy my mug. I could have gotten it for a Euro cheaper at another garden but oh well, lesson learned for next Beer Adventures of Bavaria!

 

 

La Habana Ooo La La

La Habana Ooo La La

My Mojito in La Bodeguita My Daiquiri in El Floridita.” – Ernest Hemingway.

Hemingway may have been onto something in the 1950s, but so many things have changed since his departure. Both bars are now caricatures of their former selves. Think about it, back in Ernie H’s day, these were local bars, with people going there to meet people, hang out, and perhaps even have a meaningful conversation with a local. Nowadays? Not so much.

El Floridita is a throwback to some serious first-season-of-Mad Men style, but with fruity drinks that ol’ Don Draper would sneer at, I convinced B. to join me there for a drink. The signature Daiquiri is 6 Cuban Convertible Pesos (CUC). Around the bar (packed three deep in standing room), tourists from around the world snap selfies and play with their smartphones. Many are somewhat rushed because they need to get back to their cruise ship. As for La Bodeguita? We literally couldn’t get in, because the tourists were overflowing into the street.

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Walk five minutes south from there, and things change. Away from most of the main tourist sites and historic squares, there’s a strip of bars with a healthy mix of locals and foreigners. Our favourite place has a little sign over the door that says “Aqui jamas estuvo Hemingway” – “Hemingway was never here”. Inside, another sign has a crossed-out wifi sign and says “Hablen entre ustedes”  – “No wifi, talk among yourselves”. In other words, our kind of place. Daiquiris are 3.50CUC, and the Mojitos are 3.00CUC, and are much better in quality and value than the ‘historic’ bars of Havana. Hemingway was a pretty cool dude – I’d imagine he would gravitate to this sort of a bar if he were alive today, rather than going to the themepark versions of his old haunts.

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Havana may not be Cuba’s music capitol but it sure holds it’s own. Around every corner, music is blasting from homes and restaurants. Tips are customary if you find yourself at a restaurant or bar with live music.

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Being in Havana is a distracting blend of the old, the new, and the now. The old is all around you by way of old 1950s cars smelling of gasoline and putting down main city streets. The new is the signs that American and Cuban relations are improving (albeit in fits and starts) and you see this by all of the Americans visiting the city. The now is how the Cubans live. Despite being a bustling city of over two million people, there is a strong sense of community in Havana. Everywhere you go, everyone seems to know each other. Neighbours actually talk with each other, people play dominoes in the park. Don’t get me wrong, smartphone zombies exist too, but I somehow think there’s a healthier balance of screentime and genuine interaction here than in many of the cities I’ve visited. Things have certainly changed since Hemingway’s time, but just like the vintage cars, the best elements of Cuban culture are still running strong.

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Trulli living in Alberobello, Italy

Trulli living in Alberobello, Italy

It all started with a 1997 episode of Lonely Planet (or GlobeTrotter depending of who you ask) where Justine Shapiro made her way through Southern Italy, ending up in a small town known as Alberobello. The unique huts made of stone with cone-shaped roofs that scatter the town’s skyline left an impression on me and I knew that as we embarked on our Italian adventure for my 30th birthday, we just had to stay in one of these trulli amazing houses. (Note the puns here? ;))

Trulli houses Alberobello

After our Amalfi Coast scootering adventure, we made our way back to Naples (avoid if you can!) to pick up our rental car. After dealing with Naples and having an ambulance bump our bumper in a gridlocked round about, we were on our way to Alberobello. The drive takes you just over 3 1/2 hrs which is a much more efficient way to get there vs train or bus which takes you between 5 and 6 hrs depending on when you can get your tickets for. The drive is an easy highway drive and takes you right through the middle of the country, passing by Bari as you drive through the Puglia region. Without a GPS, we did get turned around a few times but managed to get back on track with a little luck and my iPhone’s compass.

When we arrived in Alberobello, we located our hotel’s main office to check in. Tipico Resort is made up of apartments in traditional Trulli, like ours, and others in apartments. After checking in, one of the staff members jumped into our car to take us to our Trulli. When we arrived, he helped show us the best place to park in Alberobello’s narrow streets, and getting us settled in, showing us our Trullo, the mini “balcony” and informing us about when our complementary breakfast would be served. From the moment we arrived in the town, I had a good feeling – much better than my initial feeling landing in Rome (see the Amalfi Coast post for details).

By this point, it was Perroni time so B and I head out in search for a beer and a snack. As we make our way into the centre of the town, we stumbled upon a gate with a sign that said “bar”. It looked innocent enough and we had had a long drive so we decided to take our chances. As we turned the corner, we saw a few tables with the most beautiful view of the town and an older gentleman resting by the door. As we head toward the entrance of the “bar”, he got up and lead us in… into what appeared to be his basement. Unfortunately, he didn’t have Peroni on hand but gave us other options, or so I assume. He only spoke Italian… and we only spoke English. In the end, we ordered a beer each and went outside where we brought out our beers, glasses, and a yummy crispy snack.

Peroni

Alberobello’s Trulli core is easily walkable and heavily populated with restaurants, gift shops, and “look-offs for photos”. As a UNESCO World Heritage Site, it draws in lots of visitors each year, which is really starting to have an impact on the stairs and streets with which these little houses are accessible by. Since the streets are made of stone, the ample foot traffic that walk them are causing the traction to become treacherous. Tread carefully for risk ending up on your ass.

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The little shops that line these streets are packed with nick nacks and lots of food items that are known to the Puglia and Apulia regions. From wine to olive oil, orecchiette pasta (ear-shaped) to taralli crackers (the yummy snack the old man at the “bar” served), Alberobello really does pull it’s weight in being an epicurean destination. The breakfast at our hotel was extensive and delicious, with a mix of breads, fruits, and yogurt. One of the breakfast elements that really stood out to me was focaccia barese – it was like eating pizza for breakfast! Focaccia is made across Italy, but has regional differences. Focaccia Barese is the regional version that comes from Puglia and I made it one of my staples during my stay, in addition to my afternoon beer at the old man’s “bar”. (On our second stop to the “bar”, the old man noticed my countless bug bites and offered a solution… a garlic clove and ointment. He instructed me to rub the bites with the garlic clove first, then apply the ointment… the itching went away and it didn’t bother me the remainder of the trip – who knew?!?)

Focaccia Barese

20 years after Justine Shapiro visited Alberobello and peeking my interested in Southern Italy, I found too myself surrounded by beauty, amazing food, and some of Italy’s most kind and generous people. While not every aspect of my larger Italian adventure went as I had expected, Alberobello left a completely different impression on me. The uniquely shaped houses, the wine, and more may have just been impressionable enough to make me want to return for more.

Trullo Alberobello

Middle of the Earth in Quito, Ecuador

Middle of the Earth in Quito, Ecuador

All I knew about Quito before visiting was that it’s home to the equator, it has a very high altitude, and there are a lot of pick pockets. Despite my best efforts to learn more, there was very little information about the city outside of these three subjects. Oh, and potatoes.

Not only was this my first trip to South America, but it was also my first time traveling with my Mother-in-Law, who wanted to take us on a trip for her 60th birthday. After narrowing down a few destinations, it all came down to one place – the Galapagos. For years, she had wanted to go and see the Blue Footed Boobies but never wanted to spend the outrageous costs to go… that’s where we came in. As thrifty travelers, we devised a plan that consisted of a visit to Quito, followed by a flight that would take us to Isla Baltra. We would stay at a local hotel in Puerto Ayora for a few days before taking a local ferry to Isla Isabella. After a few days exploring the island, we’d backtrack, making our way back to the mainland and spending a few nights in Mindo. To start the adventure of a lifetime, we would first visit Quito, and of course, the Middle of the Earth.

It was late in the day when we arrived in Quito, and my Mother-in-Law had already arranged for an airport pick-up. After a quick Hola to our ride, we’re led through the masses of people, almost losing the driver multiple times before exiting the terminal. We all pile into the driver’s tiny SUV, with one of his helper boys (perhaps his son) in the trunk, we make our way through the streets of Quito. The city’s narrow streets sometimes make it difficult for two cars to pass each other safely, and the steep inclines must do a number on the clutches of the vehicles… but somehow, the drivers breeze through it all like it’s second nature.

Quito hotel view

Our hotel is situated in the Old Town, right next to the Plaza de San Francisco. It’s a small inn with a lush courtyard in the centre. Our host greets us with news that our separate rooms are not ready for the night, and ask if it’s okay that we share a room – one night is no big deal so we oblige. After settling in, we head towards La Ronda to grab a bite to eat. Something I learned very quickly in Ecuador is that everything starts with soup. No matter how hot it is in the Galapagos or how chilly it is in the Andes, meals start with soup. La Ronda is a pedestrian only area filled with restaurants, bars, and tour operators. Since there are a lot of tourists that pass by on a daily basis, there’s a heavy police presence. It’s best to leave your purse at home, like I did, and carry only cash in a secure pocket because there’s also a lot of petty crime in the area.

The Ciudad Mitad del Mundo (the middle of the Earth) is just 26 km from the centre of Quito. While there’s a huge monument here, and a lot of people pay a visit to see this landmark, it is not the true equator as the calculation is slightly off. The local bus is easy to catch to take you there, but if you have a few people (like we did), it makes more sense to hire a driver for the day (which we did). We arranged with our hotel to have someone take us to the equator the next day and it happened to be the sister of our airport driver. When she arrived the next morning, she had brought her two sons along (one of which was one of boys who met us at the airport!), but only the youngest accompanied us on our adventure.

Pululahua Geobotanical Reserve

Cecila and Exile were great tour guides. Cecila’s English was minimal, but she tried her best and was very helpful. Exile was entertaining. At four years old, he became my shadow most of the day and taught me a game which I like to call “Donde esta la bufanda” – “Where is the scarf”. For a good fifteen minutes, he would hide his scarf in the trunk where he was sitting and encourage me to find it. After playing for about twenty minutes, I then only found out that bufanda meant scarf… languages are not my strong suit.

They spent the day taking us to four different landmarks. The first was a pit stop to the Pululahua Geobotanical Reserve – Ecuador’s first national park overlooking the Pululahua crater that surrounds the Pululahua volcano. It’s conveniently located near the Museo Templo del Sol Pintor Cristobal Ortega Maila, Museum of the Sun Painter, which was our second stop of the day. After spending some time wandering around the property, Cecila was able to set us up on an English tour. It was a slow day at the museum but the guide walked us through the temple, highlighting its history and the art of the painter, Ortega Maila. The centre of the temple is situated on the equator so the tour guide led us in the test of balancing the egg on a nail – I failed at this task… here anyway. In addition to this, we were taken through an incense ceremony before indulging in some Coca Tea – which quickly eased B’s altitude sickness.

Museo Templo del Sol Pintor Cristobal Ortega Maila

Next visit was Mitad del Mundo, located just around the corner from Ciudad Mitad del Mundo. The tour we jumped onto here was engaging and educational, consisting of several tests to demonstrate the powers of the equator including the egg balancing trick (this time, I succeeded in balancing the egg!), and the water swirling test (clockwise vs counter clockwise in each respective hemisphere). With far fewer people than the neighbouring landmark, you have the option to stamp your passport with a special equator stamp as you exit, which I did.

Egg on nail at the equator

While we had spent the day seeing most of the sights in this area, we had one last stop to make: Ciutada Mitad del Mundo. After spending the day witnessing much of the same, the excitement of visiting had faded and I was ready to go back. If it had been up to me, I would have skipped this last stop as it’s overpriced, touristy, and littered with junky gift shops for a monument that was built on faulty GPS coordinates.

Ciutada Mitad del Mundo

It was a long day – even Exile thought so. We spent the drive back to the hotel reading the Spanish-English dictionary that we had brought along, pointing at images and Exile teaching me how to pronounce the word in Spanish. By the time we arrived back in the Old Town, I was tired, hungry, and had my fill of equator-related stunts, but it was worth it to actually succeed in balancing that egg on a nail.