Beginner’s Guide to Havana, Cuba

Beginner’s Guide to Havana, Cuba

On what might be the coldest day in Toronto this year (minus 19 WTF?!?), I can’t help but reminisce about warmer days in Havana. Last year was my first (and definitely not my last) time in Cuba. As I think about my experience as a newbie to the country, I’ve compiled the following list of Dos and Don’ts for beginners in Havana.

Take a Classic Car Ride: This is an absolute must. No matter where you are in Havana, you’re surrounded by these antique vehicles that double as taxis. Have your pick at a hard top or convertible, but just make sure you agree on a price beforehand. (And yes, you can negotiate).

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Carry Tissues and Hand Sanitizer: Keep in mind that Cuba is a pretty poor country so toilet paper and hand soap isn’t necessarily readily available. Many washrooms will have an attendant so be sure to have some spare change to give to them. If you’re a germaphobe, I suggest coming up with ways to handle the grime of the city because it would be a huge shame for you to miss out on such a beautiful city.

Always check your change: Cuba has two currencies. The Cuban Pesos are used only by locals and cannot be converted back to CAD or USD. The Cuban Convertable Peso is what you will have your cash exchanged into at home before your trip and has a higher value than the local currency. Because of the difference in currencies, it’s strongly encouraged to check your change with vendors who may confuse the two (intentionally or unintentionally). While this didn’t happen to us, I did overhear a mother/daughter duo talk about it because it had happened to them earlier in the day.

Stay in a Casa: casa is basically a homestay. Staying in a Casa allows you the opportunity to see how the locals live. We found our casa on AirBNB and they were great! While the owner and operator didn’t speak much English, her son acted as our translator. He managed most of the communication before our trip and greeted us upon our arrival. Complete with our own en-suite washroom, it was more economical than a big chain hotel and it included breakfast! Cuba is extremely safe so there’s really no concern major concerns about not staying on a resort (just be mindful about what you’re carrying and your surroundings, especially at night).

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Don’t be afraid: Step outside of your comfort zone and the tourist areas. B wanted to seek out a boxing gym in a run-down part of the city that produces some of the best boxers. Even though I had been advised to avoid that part of the city, it was the middle of the day so I joined him. As we walked past the tourist-friendly area into this “off-limits” district, people went about their day and barely took any notice of us (even though we stood out like a sore thumb). While on our journey, a young couple happened to be walking along side us and used the chance to practice their English. At first my guard was up but quickly came to my senses and knew there was no harm.

Don’t get your hopes up on anything on a menu: Quite possibly one of the biggest lessons I learned on my first trip to Cuba. Because the majority of ingredients (meat included) is of short supply, it’s common to find out that your first choice isn’t available that day, or that they’ve already run out. Be sure to select at least 3 things on the menu that you would like to eat and go from there.

As I look out my window and see the 8 centimeters of snow on my balcony, I can’t help but miss Cuba just a little bit more. If you’ve been, I’d love to hear your thoughts on what are your Dos and Don’ts when visiting Cuba! I can’t wait to go back…

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Halong Bay, Vietnam

Halong Bay, Vietnam

There are view places that have truly taken my breath away. The Kananaskis Valley in Alberta is one of them and the Amalfi Coast in Italy is another. On this trip to Vietnam, the place that had that affect on me was Halong Bay.

We were picked up by our tour (Maya Cruises) bright and early at our hotel in Hanoi. After about 2.5 hours in a ballin’ limousine bus, we arrived at the dock to board our ship. While we waited, we met some of the fellow visitors and chatted about life back home next to fish drying on the rack. While it wasn’t the fish that became part of our dinner, it did remind me of my childhood, back when my grandpa would dry and salt cod fish to preserve for the winter.

After a short taxi, we boarded our main ship with our outstanding guide, Tommy. We were greeted with a welcome drink and taken to the dining area for our 5-course lunch. This was my first cruise experience and it did not disappoint. After our lunch, we were given our room keys and told the agenda of the day. As we sailed further into the bay, the group of us made for two Australians (one of whom was originally from Vancouver), a Brit, and two Taiwanese from Halien. We quickly became a pretty tight knit group as there were only 7 of us.

After lunch and getting sorted in our rooms, we hopped into our bathing suits and prepared for our group kayaking tour around the bay. Once we were all in our respective boats, Tommy guided us around some of the house boats and showing us their oyster farms.

These house boats became a thing after the invention of polystyrene foam, which allowed for the building of cheap floating platforms. Prior to that, the families of Ha Long bay lived on land in traditional houses and in the natural caves on the islands. The last family living in a cave home moved out in 2009. Now, due to the bay’s status as a UNESCO World Heritage site, no new private homes are allowed to be built on land. Only a few yellow and red park ranger stations dot the landscape. The days of the floating homes are numbered too – the government is relocating those families back on land, due to the environmental impact of the breakdown of the polystyrene floats. I do wonder if ten years from now, visitors to Ha Long bay will see recreations of these villages, built strictly for tourists.

We chose the 3 day / 2 night option while the rest of our group would head back to Hanoi after just one night. While our boat made its way to drop the group off, we boarded a “day boat” cruise which included a different tour guide and a new group of sailers, all of whom were from neighbouring cruises in the bay. We were the last to join the group before we made our way to the famous Cat Ba island.

Cat Ba is the largest island in Halong Bay and is the only island with habitats. It’s also home to the endangered Cat Ba monkey. The monkey lives more in the middle of the island and there are less than 100 left in the world. While we didn’t see any of the monkeys, we did take a bicycle tour to Viet Hai, a small village just a few kilometres from the eastern port. The ride was a pretty easy one with only one big hill that I couldn’t tackle on the bike myself (I’m not a cycler) and the views were incredible.

After a visit to the hospital and school (both of which seem a bit much for a town of less than 200 people), we stopped in for a fish foot massage – strangest feeling ever! – and a rice wine tasting before heading back to the dock. The wines that we did try were infused with rose petals or banana… there was also the infamous snake wine which none of us tried but can be seen in a number of southeast Asian countries including Vietnam. After a nice bicycle ride back to the boat, we made our way to a kayaking raft where we paddled our way to our own private beach.

Paddling in Halong Bay really did bring us up close and personal to the bay. It’s unfortunate that over the years, so much pollution has accumulated in the bay. As you paddle around, it’s not uncommon to cross paths with multiple plastic bottles, plastic wrappers, pieces of styrofoam, and even a rubber glove. But as we made our way back to our main cruise ship, we did see two rangers gathering garbage from the bay, so there is hope for a cleaner bay in the future.

After an action packed trip, we ventured onto the water one last time to visit some caves before we left Halong to make our way back to Hanoi. I have to say that after two weeks exploring Vietnam, Halong Bay was by far one of the highlights of our entire trip. I only wish I could have spent more time…

Ho Chi Minh – Saïgon

Ho Chi Minh – Saïgon

The air is thick with the smell of gasoline, garbage, and urine. The streets are loud with the hustle and bustle like any major metropolis. As I’m attempting to cross the street, bikes weave around me at all speeds, honking to make me aware of their presence. I’ve been in Vietnam over a week and I’m now in Saigon… I don’t know what I expected but this wasn’t quite what I had in mind.

Ho Chi Minh City is big, really big. With over 13 million people and close to 8 million motorbikes, its the largest city in Vietnam. Originally settled by Khmer people, it was slowly taken over as the Vietnamese people headed south. In the 18th century, the French arrived and brought with them their architecture, food, and religion. The French ruled for 90 years and left a very big mark on the region, which can been seen in the city and street design, the buildings, and the food. During this time, the city’s name was changed to Saigon as it was easier to pronounce than Gia Dinh. The term Saigon is now interchangeable but is mostly referring to the city centre area.

After the French lost the battle of Dien Bien Phu, South Vietnam gained its independence. The country was split into two, the north being communist backed by the Soviet Union and China, and South Vietnam being non-communist. The south at the time was led by a corrupt government, which led to small gorilla armies to emerge throughout the region. The USA remained supporting the government in the south but it wasn’t long before the two regions went into war that lasted 20 years.

The Vietnam war wasn’t something that I was very familiar with. In high school, and throughout my entire education, a huge emphasis was placed on teaching the two World Wars, leaving little room to educate on both the Korean and Vietnamese wars. It might be because Canada’s independence was so closely tied to events in the WWs. So I could be brought up to speed, B and I visited both the War Remnants Museum in the city, and took a tour to the Cu Chi tunnels. Both experiences gave me the history lesson that I was craving and opened my eyes to how long-term damaging this war was, remnants that can still be seen today…

HCMC wears you down. Whether it’s the humidity, the honking, or the constant “you buys something” in the markets, it’s a draining experience. Having said that, there are moments of quiet tranquility that makes the city special in a way. Nôi Quy park near our hotel allowed for this gentle reprieve. In the morning, you can find locals enjoying the little bit of nature practising Tai Chi, exercising in the free outdoor gym, playing a game of Jianzi (like badminton but with your feet), or just relaxing or even napping on a bench. Outside of the park, you can always find people taking a break on the back of their parked motorbike or seated on a stool under an awning or umbrella. It doesn’t matter where they are, the Saigonese know how to relax. In my opinion, you have to in order to enjoy the city.

The way I enjoy a city is through their food. I had high hopes for the south as I had been told that most of what us Canadians know as Vietnamese is the food that comes from the southern region. What I quickly came to find is that HCMC is largely a city of chains. Here you’ll find Starbucks, Burger King, Popeyes Chicken, and a shocking number of Sushi and Korean restaurants. Sure there are sidewalk stalls serving up HCMC’s finest but there’s barely any room to sit as the sidewalks double as motorbike parking. Our first meal was Banh Mi (likely everywhere else we’ve visited) but to be honest, it left a lot to be desired.

Saigon does do a few things well – the markets. If you want souvenirs, cheap clothes, or even a Samsonite suitcase for cheap (like I did!), head over to Ben Thành Market. Do not pay the price given unless you’re in the no haggling area. My new suitcase cost me $50 CAD whereas back home it would be closer to $150. If you want Adidas, Nike, or Underarmour, go to the Russian Market. They also have extras from shops like Zara, Banana Republic, and Mango! Some are knock offs, but there’s a good amount that’s just excess from the factories all in Vietnam. Lastly, there’s a food stall market which was quite possibly my favourite thing to do in Saigon aside from the museums. It’s just around the corner from the Ben Thanh Market and bares its name. Here you can find most Vietnamese dishes like Banh Mi, Pho, Bun Chai, and of course, my favourite, Banh Xeo.

While Saigon/Ho Chi Minh isn’t the prettiest, cleanest, or calmest city ever and despite its faults, I’m forever grateful for the chance to have visited and experienced all that makes it special.

Hue – A Foodie’s Paradise

Hue – A Foodie’s Paradise

Hue was on my list as we planned out our trip to Vietnam. Ho Chi Minh (Saigon) was on B, and Hanoi we knew we had to do. I wanted to do Hue for the Old Imperial Capital, or the Citadel as they call it… but what I quickly came to learn about Hue was more than old building ruins, I have learned the Hue should be more known for the food.

Sure Bourdain (RIP) had visited before, and I had seen the last episode he did while visiting the region, but it didn’t hit me until our first meal. In the pouring, soon to be monsoon-like, rain that stayed with us the entire time, we made our way to grab some lunch after our hour flight from Hanoi. We stumbled upon the restaurant and bar area of Hue city centre and plopped down at a place called Xuân Trang where I order Banh Khoai (without the pork of course!) and an order of chicken with rice. B got Nem Lui (ground pork patties grilled on lemongrass skewers). Place number one set the bar high.

Our first food in Hue was amazing, my jet-lag, not so much. Four days into the trip and I still had trouble sleeping the entire night, needing naps during the day… but my Hue nap took us into well into the night and we ended up missing dinner. At 11:30 pm we took to the street only to find that Hue is not a town of late night eats. After wandering around for a good 30 minutes in the rain, I turned on my data and found a food stall that serves burgers and fries… not very traditional but I was starving. We weren’t the only ones, and found a group of three Malaysian travellers who were also in search of food. We all went to the burger stand together and took it back to our respective hotels… even Hue’s roadside burgers and fries are outstanding!

Breakfast the next morning was included in our hotel. The buffet had a wide assortment of fresh fruit, breads and pastries, meats (which B made a comment on), rice, crepes and more. What really stood out was the pho. I’ve come to learn over my short time in Vietnam is that pho is eaten really any time of the day… and it differs depending on the city (not really a surprise here). B was so obsessed with it that he convinced me to get a bowl. And he was right to obsess over it, it was THAT good. (Naturally I asked for mine without the beef in it – I’m so complicated)

Aside from the Banh Khoai which I so desperately wanted to try, I wanted Banh Beo. These tiny coin shaped rice circles come with shrimp and fried onions and I had had them at a Vietnamese restaurant back in Canada. Knowing that they’re a uniquely Hue dish, I knew I had to check it off my list. We ordered a dish of them at a restaurant called Madam Thu, which serves up traditional Vietnamese food and has vegetarian options! As our mains, B ordered chicken and rice while I ordered a vegetarian Banh Khoai (honestly, could not get enough on that stuff!). Our Banh Beo came with the traditional fish sauce but what really made the dish was the chilli sauce that they provided. The spicy was a nice compliment and I should have ordered more.

I could go on and on about the food in Hue, but all good things must come to an end. Aside from the endless rain, and the crippling jet lag that I still haven’t kicked after 6 days, we’ve made our way to our next destination (Hoi An). But I know that Hue will always have a special place in my food-loving heart.

4 things to know before going to your 1st premier league game

4 things to know before going to your 1st premier league game

Ok, I have a confession to make… I know nothing about soccer, errr, I mean football… but on my latest trip to the UK, I faked it.

Three weeks before boarding our flight to London, B texted me to say he could score Premier League tickets for under $150 CAD each. While it’s a steep price to pay for a game that I know very little about, I’m always up for an experience while on a trip. And honestly, what’s more authentic than seeing a game of footie? After some himming and hahhing around the price, we bit the bullet and bought the tickets through Stub Hub.

If you’ve never been to a premier league game before, or even if you have, these are some observations/lessons learned from my first-time experience.

Don’t expect to actually sit in your seat. Unless you’re in the first few rows of the lower bowl of course. Our seats where at the end field behind the net, which would have been fine if we were sitting… but everyone stands THE ENTRIE GAME! Since our seats were behind the net, there was a bit of an overhang. This wouldn’t have been an issue if everyone was seated, but instead we were forced to bend over every time there was action at the other end of the field. While it was annoying, it was a lesson learned.

I could see the whole field when I was in the stairwell… but the rest of the game, I was looking at the gent’s head in front of me.

There are no beverages allowed in the stands. Going into the game, I knew this, but coming from Canada where sports and beer are a match made in heaven, it was a bit strange. Instead, hoards of people begin to leave their un-sat-in seats to pound two brews during the brief intermission about 5 minutes before the first half of the game is over. I admit, it’s not a terrible idea to not allow alcohol in the stands (it keeps it cleaner for sure), but the pounding of multiple pints isn’t very enjoyable for someone like me who likes to enjoy a beer unrushed.

The chants are about anything and everything. I had heard that some of the chants were offensive but I came to realize that most are completely random. One in particular seemed to have been created on the spot about a lone pigeon that was enjoying the sun on the field. While the game played on around him, he appeared to give little care to who was winning, or if the ball was flying in his direction. After about 15 minutes in his front row view of the game, he took off for flight and the chant “One Chelsea Pigeon” started up. I assumed it was something that happened so often that the chant was a common one, but I looked… it’s not. I’ll never forget the One Chelsea Pigeon chant for as long as I live.

You’ll need a ticket to get into the Club’s Pub after the game – and you’ll want to do it! After the game everyone takes to the street in search of winning celebrations. If your team loses, then I’m sure everyone’s out to drown their sorrows, thankfully Chelsea won! In our case, we wanted a pint at a local and it just so happens that the pub where Chelsea FC all started it just down the road a bit from where we exited. To get in post-game, you’ll need to show your ticket… and if you’re wearing the away jersey, don’t expect to get in. The place is packed and like most pubs, you go straight to the bar to order your drink… then it’s standing room only (unless you left the game in time to get a table). Post game celebrations are a must and really round out the entire experience.

Have you been to a premier league game before? If so, I’d love to hear about it! Leave a comment below 🙂

My top 5s of Toronto

My top 5s of Toronto

 

This past weekend, a friend of mine flew in from Calgary. He had been to Toronto a handful of times and was only in town for a day. After arranging a time to meet up, the old familiar question came up, “So, what do you wanna do?”

This all too familiar question is one that I ask myself on a weekly basis, usually over Saturday morning coffee with B – What do we want to do? It’s summer in Canada’s most populated city and yet, we still need to ask ourselves that question… usually to the same answer, “I dunno.”

As I reflect on this question, I’ve devised a list of my top three things to do in the following 5 categories:

  • Shopping
  • Adventure
  • Food and Drinks
  • Nightlife
  • Free

Hopefully, by the end, I’ll have answered my question so I can make the most of the rest of this summer – and you can too!

Shopping

I’m definitely not a mega shopper by any means, but I do enjoy a splurge every once in a while. Which is why I really love Yorkville. This pedestrian-friendly shopping district has all of the big names Carrie Bradshaw would crave. Prada, Gucci, and Louis Vuitton to name a few (I’m sure you’ve heard of them), but also shops that are a little more within my price range – There’s even a Winners!!

If big names aren’t your style and you’re looking for something a little more eclectic, Kensington Market has you covered. Located just north of Chinatown, Kensington Market is a pedestrian district filled with vintage inspired shops, cute cafes, and instagram-worthy corners. It’s not for the faint of heart, but an area that everyone needs to visit at least once.

If it’s food you love to shop for, hands-down my favourite foodie find is St. Lawrence Market. Within walking distance from Union Station, you’ll want to bring your appetite to St. Lawrence Market. The indoor market is open year-round and holds a multitude of butchers, cheesemongers, vegetable vendors, bakeries, and even a mustard vendor! Head downstairs if you need a break from shopping and indulge in any culture of foods – but really, what you’ll want is the eggplant parmesan sandwich from Uno Mustachio and you may want to split it with a friend!

Adventure

In my opinion, you can’t truly adventure in Toronto without visiting the Toronto Islands. The islands are just a short ferry ride away and are the perfect mini adventure to escape from the hustle and bustle of the city. Since you can’t drive to the islands, boating or biking are often transportation methods of choice. You can rent either from either side of the ferry and even though hoards of people make their way across every summer weekend, there’s plenty of water-front locations that you can call your own. If you’re feeling extra adventurous, there’s always Hanlan’s Point (the ever so popular clothing-optional beach).

Toronto Island

If you’re someone who likes to splurge for adventure, there’s always the CN Tower edgewalk. Now I’ll be honest, this isn’t exactly how I would prefer to spend a lovely Sunday afternoon, but for those who are super adventurous and aren’t afraid of heights – this one’s for you.

For those who cringe at the thought of extreme heights and hanging out nude outdoors, there’s always Toronto’s multitude of Escape Rooms. These puzzles have themes that appeal to almost everyone from a Harry Potter themed adventure to escaping rooms in a real life castle at Casa Loma!

Food and Drink

If I’m going to be completely honest with myself, 90% of my entertainment in this city centres around food, and drinking. It’s a vice that I don’t know if I want to kick considering the territory I still have yet to cover.

For evenings that are special, I like to spend the night at a little place in the Distillery called Cluny. This French-inspired bistro never fails to impress me. From the wine selection to the ever-changing, seasonal menu, this resto is our go-to when we want to splurge.

I’ve always said that my last meal on Earth would be Mexican and Toronto definitely punches above its weight in delivering authentic cuisine that is muy bien. With so many great places, it’s hard to short list them but if I must, here are my top 3:

  • Playa Cabana on Dupont
  • El Caballito Taquila y Tacos on King St W
  • Barrio Cerveceria on Queen E

If it wasn’t Mexican, or French, it would have to be Japanese. When we moved to Toronto almost two years ago, I have to admit that good sushi was hard to find… but Izakayas are second to none (ok… maybe Japan). Our go-to Japanese snack bar is a little off the traditional tourist path, but well worth it: Sake Bar Kushi on Eglinton.

Nightlife

My nights of bar hopping and cover have long since past – so if you’re looking to me to tell you the hot dance spots in TO, I’m sorry to disappoint. Instead, I’d rather gather with a group of friends over drinks and fun. Here are my top three ways to spend an evening on the town.

I’m competitive… so when I can spend an evening kicking my friends’ asses at a game of ping pong over beer, I’m all of it. SPIN, located on King W, is my absolute favourite place to crush an evening.

Toronto attracts talent – so it’s no shocker that on most weekends, you can catch some type of show. With 5 Mirvish theatres in the downtown core, and multiple music venues big and small, a night out to catch a show is within easy reach.

If a more laid back, tame evening is what you’re looking for, gathering with friends over some board games is always a good time. Snakes and Lattes (not just coffee, they have beer and wine too!) allows you to play unlimited games with your crew without needed to pack your closet with an assortment of games you’ll only play once or twice.

Free

Living in Toronto isn’t cheap, so sometimes all a girl needs is a night that doesn’t put a dent into my bank account. The city is insanely walkable – even though it’s a very vast city. I’d recommend exploring one neighbourhood at a time and expand from there. Harbourfront, Queen West, Leslieville, and the Distillery District are all good places to start!

Coming from the east coast, I have always been spoiled by beauty and beaches… grudgingly, I have to say that Toronto has somewhat the same. While the beaches in Toronto are 10x more populated, and not on the ocean, they’re free and a great way to spend a summer day.

One thing that Toronto also does well is festivals – and many of them have free components. Just this past weekend, there were at least 3 festivals happening on the same weekend, all with free entry (but bring cash for some cheap eats).

The many beers of Bavaria

The many beers of Bavaria

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When people first think of Munich, many think of the world famous Oktoberfest, lederhosen, and beer… and I’m not going to lie, before heading there I had the same preconceptions too. However, after spending a week in the area, I’ve come to realize there’s more to Bavaria than just beer, beer, and well, more beer, despite the title of this blog post 😉

Our first beer on the trip introduced us to HOFBRÄU MÜNCHEN WEISSE, which we lovingly enjoyed in the Hofbräuhaus. This iconic landmark provided us with a great introduction to Bavarian beer, and culture. The large beerhall consists of high cellings and long tables, which encourages you to meet new people to share a pint with. Within a short time of being seated, a nice local couple sat next to us. It was quite clear that we weren’t from around the area and offered to take our photo. From there, we enjoyed the live music together and even though we couldn’t speak the same language, I’d like to think there was a small bond between us and them.

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When we crossed the border to neighbouring Austria, our beer of choice was of course Stiegl. At this point in our trip, I had been living off head-sized pretzels and I was looking for something to round out my limited diet. Thankfully, Salzburg had just what I needed. The land of Mozart and Sound of Music supplied me with chicken schnitzel, salads, and bread with cheese and it was all glorious. Aside from the food, the town was quaint and conveniently located to where I really wanted to make a visit – Berchtesgaden.

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I had heard about Berchtesgaden from a coworker who visited there when she spent a semester abroad in high school. This charming little town built on the edge of the Austrian alps is known for skiing, hiking, and history. When I say history, I refer to the Eagle’s Nest, a mountain top retreat gifted to Hitler on his 50th birthday. This majestic retreat is now a tourist attraction with thousands of visitors making the trek, dining at the mountain’s edge, with their selfie sticks at the ready. At the foot of the mountain is Dokumentationszentrum Obersalzberg, a powerful museum that takes you through the rise and fall of the Nazi party. I always thought that this was something that Germany wanted to forget, but this museum shows the importance of highlighting the past, to ensure that history does not attempt to repeat itself. As I mentioned, it’s a powerful museum and I’m forever grateful that I had the chance to walk through and learn of the history from the German’s perspective compared to what we learn growing up in Canada.

As I basked in the sun on the top of the mountain ridge, I enjoyed some more Hofbräu. It was my birthday afterall 😉 Before taking the golden lift to the top, we had lunch with some non-alcoholic brews (yes, they have non-alcoholic beer too!) produced by Weininger. It was light and refreshing and paired nicely with my veggie burger! I’m as surprised as you that not only did this restaurant have non-alcoholic beer, but they also had VEGGIE BURGERS! It truly was a win in my books!

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The beer gardens of Munich are plentiful and populated. On our last day in Munich, after quite the eventful morning where I dropped my backpack into a bath of toilet water (it was honestly the worst morning of our trip), I needed one last beer garden brew. Again, it was Hofbräu but about the size of my head. It was a Tuesday and the small garden located along the river was less populated as it was near the banking district. As I got my second, and smaller beer, I decided that the mug from which I was drinking would make a good souvenir. Something to note, that I wish I had known earlier, is that every beer garden charges you a deposit on the mug. When you order your beer, you pay an extra two Euro or three, depending on the location. If you bring the mug back, you get your money. If not, the mug is yours. I only learned this on the last day in the beer garden when I asked if I could buy my mug. I could have gotten it for a Euro cheaper at another garden but oh well, lesson learned for next Beer Adventures of Bavaria!