Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica

It took me so many years of unbareable Canadian winters to finally do what so many Canadians do – escape the winter… well, at least for a week. I wanted a place where the only worry I would have is not putting on enough sun screen. This dream came true when I took my first trip to Costa Rica.

I know many people who go “down-south” consistently every year. They book their all-inclusive vacations at the most opportune time and they get great deals. They get off the plane, get taxied to their resort, and set up at the beach with unlimited drinks at their fingertips. For me, it’s just not how I want to experience a different country. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve done it (see my post on my experience in Mayan Mexico), but I crave a different type of holiday. Instead, I want off the beaten path, somewhere that is slightly unknown, but still known enough… that’s what brought me to Costa Rica.

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Instead of heading for the tourist-laden land of Jaco, B and I rent a Suzuki Jimny and made our way to the opposite coast, the Caribbean. I don’t want to say traveling this way was a breeze. The rental car agency took three hours to get us a vehicle (some people had been waiting longer) and when we finally got on the road, well, let’s just say driving on Costa Rican roads are not for the faint of heart (or for those afraid of heights). Having said that, I wouldn’t have traveled any other way – except maybe by motorcycle. After one wrong turn that took us back to Limon twice, we finally arrived at our destination: Puerto Viejo de Talamanca.

Surfing. Chocolate. Reggae. PV has it all. A little more off the beaten path than other spots across the country, you get a much different experience here than you would any where else in the country. With a thick influence of reggae culture, it’s a laid back, surfing crowd that is drawn to this area. PV is home to Salsa Brava, Costa Rica’s heaviest wave and I’m told that surfers flock from all areas of the world to surf it. While I’m not a surfer by any means, if you’re interested in riding your first wave in Costa Rica, there are many beach side stalls along Playa Cocles that are walkable from the town itself – or by popular transport in PV, bicycle.

If you do plan to walk to Playa Cocles from PV – take the forest path starting at the end of town near Hot Rocks. It’s not best to trek this with flip flops, as there are a number of snake species in the area that you likely don’t want to step on, but you’re almost guaranteed to see some type of wildlife, whether it be some howler monkeys or a toucan or two. Once you’ve pretty much made it to the beach, take a break for a beer and/or snack at Tasty Waves – there’s an opening in the bushes to get back to the road.

The beach is not the only thing to do in the area. Our #1 highlight of the entire trip was divided between two attractions in the area. The first (not in order of favourtism because both experiences were #1 in our books) was the Jaguar Animal Rescue Center just outside of town, and Caribeans Chocolate tour.

IMG_0418The Jaguar Animal Rescue Center is in one word – amazing. Run by volunteers, this center rescues native animals in the region and re-integrates them back into their natural habitat. Some animals are badly injured and cannot be re-integrated but those that do are released in to a safe area at first and then back into the wild. The work of the volunteers changes daily whether it be hanging out with the monkeys, or sitting with a sleeping jaguar, to feeding and cleaning the animals… all of their jobs are so significant and everyone genuinely looks happy to be a part of it. I’ve already told B many times, that the next time we visit, I’m doing this. The staff are extremely knowledgeable and show you every corner of the rescue. At the end of the tour, you’re free to walk around on your own but keep in mind, it’s only open in the mornings. We went as soon as they opened as other visitors had suggested that time to be best.

IMG_0432An equally amazing experience in PV was going on the Caribeans Chocolate Tour. I’ve done significant research as part of my MBA on fair trade coffee and it was my goal to go on a coffee tour while in the country (sadly, that didn’t happen but this chocolate tour was beyond my expectations). We learned not only about how cocoa is produced, but the history of chocolate making around the world, how to taste chocolate for all of its complexities, and the business of cocoa in the region. I know what you’re thinking – please, tasting chocolate? But it’s true! I did not appreciate the different elements that live within a small piece of dark chocolate until I took this tour. Not only that, but the owner of the farm (originally from Florida) explained fair trade to the group and how he works hard to ensure all those he purchases additional cocoa from are compensated well above market price (even higher than the fair trade market price). In order to create different chocolate flavours, he purchases cocoa from various indigenous tribes around the area. Since working with them, they are now more interested and involved in the chocolate made from their cocoa than ever before. Near the end of the tour, the owner takes you up to the tasting plateau which offers stunning views of the valley and serves you a range of chocolate including a traditional Mayan chocolate drink – all laid out and prepared by his wife. I haven’t been on any other chocolate tours, but I don’t know how any other could possibly compare.

IMG_0326The whole PV experience would not be complete without mentioning our accommodations. After the long trek from San Jose, we finally arrived at our destination: Cashew Hill Jungle Cottages. Just at the back-end of town atop a hill, is situated the most amazing set of cottages I have ever stayed in. When we arrived at the bottom of the hill, I was nervous that we wouldn’t get up it but we did and were welcomed by Andrew, the owner. He’s young, hip, knowledgeable, and so welcoming that I felt as if I had known him for years. His two dogs, Stella and Harley, are there to welcome you as well – fyi: in Costa Rica, there are dogs everywhere – in PV, larger dogs for security. Our cottage overlooked Salsa Brava and despite a few ants (which is to be expected in a rugged jungle setting), there was literally no care in the world. Hungry? No problem – grab a starfruit from your balcony. Have some bugs? There’s a gecko for that! Tired? Chill out in your own hammock for hours on end. Everything you care and worry about back home simply melts away and here is a place where you can truly chill out and relax.

Puerto Viejo wasn’t our only stop on our trip but it was certainly the most memorable. It’s now been too long since we’ve been there and I’m itching to go back.

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