Mayan Mexico

I’ve never been someone who quivers at the thought of rappelling down a mountain, or climbing up to the top of a tower and looking down – never… until I went to Mexico.

Mexico has always had my interest. Even as a young girl, Mexican food was always my favourite (well, what I knew of Mexican food anyway!). I just never really had the opportunity to go, until B and I wanted to take a trip with two of our close friends. After running through our list of options, we all agree on Mexico, just outside of Playa del Carmen. My first time doing an all-inclusive!

When we arrive, we pack into a hotel shuttle which takes us to our resort. It’s close to a two-hour drive from the airport and it’s dark by the time we reach our resort in Xpu Ha. Our resort is made up of a series of cabins, and has a wildlife “sanctuary” intertwined throughout the resort. It’s a resort that has seen better days (which is why I’m choosing not to name it), but the staff are friendly and after the first pool day, we’ve made friends with the entertainment staff who quickly know us by first name and call on us to join them in dancing, pool games, and trivia. We’re there for a full week and to keep busy, we devise a week of pool/beach days at the resort with bi-daily trips outside of the resort.

Mexico 2

Our first day trip is to Playa del Carmen. The resort has a “free” shuttle to the city, with an hour jewelry “tour” built in. I use the word “tour” lightly because really, all it is is a large room with jewelry to buy. While we don’t buy anything, we do get a free souvenir with our name written out with traditional Mayan script which is pretty cool.

Playa del Carmen is a resort city, a package tour paradise. A blend of night clubs, souvenir shops, and tour operators are all within walking distance. There’s a disbelief amongst Canadians and Americans that Mexico is dangerous – but I felt perfectly safe in this little piece of paradise.

After some Chicken tacos and some tequila tasting and education, we wander the streets before heading back to the resort for dinner. I’m not used to working against such a timeline and I know I’ll be back to Playa before we leave.

Taco

Day three is a resort day and we split our time between hanging out with the animals and relaxing by the pool. While relaxing by a pool and having drinks served to you at a whim is nice, I’m craving a bit of adventure. I want to climb Coba, and go Zip-lining – thankfully, there is an excursion for that! In addition to three zip-lines, we can kayak, rappel down a mountain, AND swim in a cenote – what more could a girl want? On day four, we leave our resort by 8 a.m. and we’re on our way to our adventure.

Our tour is organized by Alltournatives and they’re great! After picking us up, we make our way to our first adventure stop – kayaking, cenote, and zip-lining. While the kayaking was a bit of a joke (we’re pretty avid kayakers), it was a nice start to the day. After the short journey, we take a short trek towards an enclosed cenote for a swim. If you haven’t swam in a cenote, or are unaware of what it is, it’s basically a natural sinkhole which creates secret swimming holes. The Yucatan Peninsula is famous for them and are sacred spots in the Mayan culture. Because of this, after our swim (which was incredibly refreshing), we attend a Mayan prayer ceremony. After a blessing from a Mayan elder, we continue on to zip-line #1.

I wish I had photos but the tour does not allow for cameras during the adventure portions of the excursion – which actually makes a lot of sense – Go Pros are permitted but I didn’t have one just yet. Moving on to our next adventure, we’re transported to a location just a few kilometers down the road. We’re led to a second zip-line which then brings us to our rappel down the mountain. The Zip-line was a blast so I volunteered myself and B to rappel first. Having done rock climbing multiple times, I thought this was going to be a breeze. I get all geared up and set myself up to back towards the edge and just like that, I freeze. I freeze hard. I can’t move. My palms are sweaty and I can’t move. Despite the staff urging me back, I freeze and demand to be removed from the ledge. And just like that, I don’t rappel down the mountain.

Still shaking from the rappelling incident, we head to lunch (which is provided as part of the tour). Lunch is buffet style and made of traditional Mayan dishes – all of which are fantastic. After a little shopping, we head to our final destination: Coba. Like Chichen Itza, Coba is an ancient Mayan city where visitors can explore the historic ruins. Unlike other ruins in the area, you can still climb the Pyramid in Coba (for now) and that honestly was one of my biggest draws to visit. You can explore the park by bicycle, on foot, or hire a rickshaw to take you around. We opt for the cheapest option – on foot and it’s hot. By the time we arrive to the foot of the Nohoch Mul Pyramid, I’m over heating and burnt to a crisp, but keen to do the climb anyway.

coba

Because the steps are so small and fragile, you pretty much need to climb with your hands and feet to ensure you don’t lose your balance. To ensure that you don’t get in people’s way, you climb up on the right, and shimmy down on the left. Halfway up, I have a great idea to stop… bad idea. I take one look back and freeze. Until this point, I HAVE NO FEAR OF HEIGHTS. It’s like something snap in me and my knees go weak, and my palms are sweaty and I can’t move. I urge B to continue on and after some debate, he agrees. As people make their way past me, I realize that I can’t even move to get down… and I start to panic. Tears are rolling down my cheeks, my heart is pounding, and I panic. After a random stranger stops to ask me if I’m okay, I swallow my pride and gather enough courage to scuttle my butt over to the left and make my way down to the bottom. I’ve never felt so happy to be on solid ground.

Day five comes quickly and I’ve had my fill of unlimited drinks, pool time, and resort life. By the end of the day, B and I have a breakout plan to adventure without organization. On day six, we have breakfast with our friends and make our way to the entrance for the resort. We ask the guards to flag us down a collectivo – local bus – that will take us into Playa del Carmen. We’re lucky and are picked up on our first attempt! Cramped into the little van with a handful of locals, we make our way to the city. Upon our arrival, we wander some of the streets we missed out on our first time around, looking for some lunch and figuring out our plan. After a short time, we settle on taking the ferry to Cozumel, but first, a quesadilla!

The ferry is just under an hour and it’s simple to get tickets. You can purchase ticket right at the dock and line up from there. We sat on the top deck near the back and before we knew it, we were in a different part of Mexico. The ferry drops you off in San Miguel and you’re in the centre of town. The island is very small and accessible, and strangely different from the mainland with a slightly more Spanish flare to the architecture. After exploring the main town for an hour, we decide to rent scooters and explore even more of the island. There are multiple vendors so renting a scooter is easy, and affordable. After we settle on a shop, we make our way to the country side. Getting outside of the city centre was the best part of our trip. The island is easy riding, with so many opportunities to stop and enjoy the views. Untouched beaches, the open road, and warm breezes make me wish we had spent our entire trip on this little island. By the time we return the bikes, we miss our ferry and have to wait for the next one – putting us back in Playa after dark.

Cosumel

We wander the streets, making our way to the collectivo stand to head back to the resort for one last dinner. The drivers stand outside of their van calling out the destination names. With my limited Spanish, I find the collectivo heading towards our resort and the driver urges us to sit up front. He knows the hotel well and drops us along the side of the road directly across from our resort’s entrance.

Little did I know that just seven days in Mexico would teach me such lessons about myself – mainly that I am afraid of heights and not all resort experiences are created equally.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Mayan Mexico

  1. I learned I was afraid of heights on top of the pyramid at Chichen Itza, in the Late eighties when you could still climb it. I was shaking and terrified coming down the narrow steps.
    I didn’t know they were off limits to climbing now but it makes sense.
    Nice article glad you enjoyed it. Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this:
search previous next tag category expand menu location phone mail time cart zoom edit close